A lot would be the grossly understated answer to that question. So much war, poverty, disease, economic uncertainty and the lists of films at 11pm just go on and on. Much discussion has been given to how music is or isn’t a reflection of the times. Often music and other art forms are used as a means of escape from the harsh realities of life. Nothing wrong with that in and of itself, but when there is no balance between escapist style and the documentary style of music reality can become distorted.

Not to be a Debbie Downer but for every drink put up in the club there is a cost far beyond the bar tab. For every six figure automobile that costs a week’s pay (for some) to fill up with gas there’s a cost beyond the obvious. Somewhere on the earth someone is uncomfortable so that you can be comfortable. While some revel in the illusion of being a superpower, others understand that there is an ultimate cost to subscribing to such a fallacy and that the same fuel that gave you power could ultimately end up being your kryptonite.

What does this have to do with music? Everything? It seems that some of these issues and more have been on Leon Timbo’s mind and he’s put pen to paper to document these thoughts. If there is to be any balance in the marketplace it’s up to the people to create it. As a collective we really are stronger than any corporation would have us to believe. So instead of a musical diet that consists of only chocolate chip cookies, we need a little protein and vegetation to balance it all out.

Ivan Orr is a multi-instrumentalist, composer, performer, and writer. A native of Charlottesville, Virginia Ivan was involved with the forming and nascent days of The Music Resource Center as its first Program Director. A graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Department of Music, Ivan currently resides in Richmond, VA where he maintains an active performance and production schedule while serving as the Music Editor for Grown Folks Music, a position he has held since 2010.